Because it shouldn’t be any other way!
RSS icon Home icon
  • Which Inspections Should I Do When Buying a Home?

    Posted on March 17th, 2014 acimetta No comments

    In a typical real estate transaction in southern California, the buyer has 17 days to do all their due diligence. This includes hiring inspectors to evaluate the condition of the home. Here are some of the inspections that you can consider doing:

    Home Inspection
    This is the bread & butter of inspections. Everyone should have a home inspection. This is a generalist who will assess the following: foundation, roof, plumbing, electrical, appliances. This inspector is not a specialist in any of these areas, but will be able to tell you the general condition of these items and point out any safety concerns and recommended upgrading. The home inspector will recommend you seek an expert in any of these areas if there is some concern about the condition of these items. For instance, if the inspector sees droppings in the attic, he will recommend a termite inspection. If the inspector, sees moisture under a sink, he will recommend a plumber for further investigation. But often,  a buyer can base his Request for Repairs on the home inspection report. Keep in mind, that not all home inspectors are created equal. Make sure you use an inspector who is licensed and bonded. Also, it’s a good idea to use someone that either your agent or friend/family member has had experience with.

    Mold Inspection
    Mold inspections are not done as regularly as home inspections. But they should be! I always insist that my clients get a mold inspection. Water is a homeowner’s worst enemy and often water damage can go undetected, wreaking havoc behind the scenes. A good mold inspector helps give you a more well-rounded picture of your soon to be new home. And often it can save you from walking into some nightmarish repairs.

    Video Sewer Line Inspection
    If you want to know the condition of your sewer line, you can have a plumber or sewer line specialist come to the property and put a video camera into the sewer line. You will be able to see if there are any blockages in the line or possibly even tree roots that are impeding the sewer line. I usually recommend this to people who are buying older homes with mature trees on the property.

    Roof Inspection
    If you have any questions about the condition of the roof that your home inspector can’t answer or if your home inspector recommends further investigation by a roofer, it’s a good idea to bring someone out who can quote you the cost of a new roof or needed repairs. Often, you can get a roofer to come out for a free estimate.

    Foundation Inspection
    If you are concerned with some visible cracks or the home inspector thinks there could be some foundation issues, it can be a good idea to hire a foundation inspector. I think it’s helpful to find a foundation inspector who’s also a structural engineer.

    Geologic Inspection
    Depending on where this house is located, a geologic inspection is something you may want to consider. If there’s concern with the soil or condition of the land, this can be a worthy investment. Areas like Malibu would be a good place to do a geologic inspection.

    Termite Inspection
    Normally, the seller will pay for a termite inspection. This report will show signs of termite damage, termite infestation, and dry rot. Keep in mind, when a Wood Destroying Pest Addendum is included in a contract, the lender will require that all termite work be done prior to funding the loan. Typically, a seller will agree to pay for these items. It’s just a matter of coordinating the work prior to escrow closing.

    These represent a good number of inspections that you can do as a buyer. Basically, if you have any questions or concerns, you can always bring in an expert for further evaluation. The money you spend on inspections can add up, but it’s a good insurance policy against purchasing a home that will be a money pit of repairs.

  • Real Estate Advice: Am I Able to do an Inspection before I close?

    Posted on February 21st, 2013 acimetta No comments

    Yes, you should have the option to do inspections before you close. In California, buyers typically have 17 days from acceptance to do their inspections. If within those 17 days, the buyers decide that they don’t like what they find, then they can walk away. If the buyers do their inspections, then remove their contingencies, then they are committed to the property and the deposit becomes nonrefundable.

    It’s extremely important for you to get your inspections done as soon as possible especially if you want to do any further negotating with the seller on repairs, a credit or a price reduction. If your looking at a single family home, I would always recommend a home inspection and a mold inspection. The home inspection will give you a general understanding of the roof, foundation, plumbing, electrical, appliances, HVAC, fireplace, etc. The mold inspection focuses on water/mold issues. So many buyers don’t do a mold inspection, but it’s so important. Water is absolutely damaging to a home and so many times there can be leaks or mold problems that the homeowner is not even aware of. Needless to say, I have all my buyers do a mold inspection. And depending on the age of the home and the existence of large trees on the property, I also suggest a video sewer line inspection which will let you know if there are any obstructions (such as tree roots) or clogging issues. Replacing a sewer line can be expensive and it’s a good idea to know up front what you’re dealing with.

  • Home Inspection Review

    Posted on March 11th, 2011 acimetta No comments

    I just had the opportunity to work with Professional Inspection Network this week. Clients of mine are buying a home in Redondo Beach and Chris Vella from Professional Inspection Network came out to the property. He did a thorough inspection and took color photos, making it easier for my clients to understand and follow the inspection report. What really impressed me was that this company offers, at no cost, consultative services to all their clients. So in the event my clients ever have to do work on their home, they can call Professional Inspection Network to review any quotes they get. This way they can make sure the work that is being done is necessary and they are being charged a fair price. It made my clients feel good to have someone in their corner who is watching out for their best interest.

  • The Importance of Inspections

    Posted on June 24th, 2010 acimetta No comments

    I recently had an experience with a client that served as a huge reminder of the importance of inspections. Often, buyers do their inspections and identify minor repairs that are needed around the house. It’s normal; they are not buying a brand new home. Sometimes the seller will pay for the repairs and sometimes they won’t, but they can usually come to a satisfactory agreement, and the buyers can press forward and buy the property. In this instance, everything went well with the home inspection. Minor issues were uncovered. The seller was willing to fix most of the items to my clients’ satisfaction. Then we had the mold inspection. The mold inspector detected moisture in a wall on the ground level. He tracked the source of the water to a leak at the exterior wall where the weather proofing had been ripped apart. (The weather proofing contractor would later explain that the weather proofing installed when the house was built was yellow jacket, an inexpensive, not very durable material.) The mold inspector drew the conclusion that the plant roots along the side of the house caused the tear in the weather proofing and ultimately, the sprinklers leaked into the house. This discovery led the seller to reveal that there was moisture in the same wall 10 years ago. The wall was patched but the source of the leak was never identified. The sellers merely cut down the time on the sprinklers, never noticing that the weather proofing was no longer in tact. So it was quite possible that the sprinklers were leaking into the house for at least 10 years.  No matter the fault, we had caught a relatively serious issue, and the seller agreed to replace the weatherproofing and stop the leak.  But there was still the issue of the moisture in the wall. The inspector suggested we open up the wall in order to dry it out and to assess the damage. The seller said no, because they had looked in the wall only 6 weeks earlier while doing some aesthetic patching and said it was dry. My clients were frustrated with this conflicting information. They really wanted the house and were willing to pay for some of the damage, but they wanted to make sure that the cost wouldn’t be astronomical. They even offered to pay for the cost of opening and patching the wall in order to look inside it. After days of negotiating, the seller finally agreed to open the wall. When the wall was opened, we ultimately found that the studs were riddled with mold. And it was possible that the mold extended into the second floor. Repairs would have cost much more than what my clients were willing to spend, and the house would no longer be a good buy. The mold inspection identified problems that never came up on the home inspection report or on the seller’s disclosures. It was only the buyer’s due diligence and thoroughness that uncovered problems that could have been easily overlooked. Had my clients closed escrow and had not spent the time and money to do their inspections, they could have been saddled with some extensive mold and water intrusion problems down the road.