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  • Which Inspections Should I Do When Buying a Home?

    Posted on March 17th, 2014 acimetta No comments

    In a typical real estate transaction in southern California, the buyer has 17 days to do all their due diligence. This includes hiring inspectors to evaluate the condition of the home. Here are some of the inspections that you can consider doing:

    Home Inspection
    This is the bread & butter of inspections. Everyone should have a home inspection. This is a generalist who will assess the following: foundation, roof, plumbing, electrical, appliances. This inspector is not a specialist in any of these areas, but will be able to tell you the general condition of these items and point out any safety concerns and recommended upgrading. The home inspector will recommend you seek an expert in any of these areas if there is some concern about the condition of these items. For instance, if the inspector sees droppings in the attic, he will recommend a termite inspection. If the inspector, sees moisture under a sink, he will recommend a plumber for further investigation. But often,  a buyer can base his Request for Repairs on the home inspection report. Keep in mind, that not all home inspectors are created equal. Make sure you use an inspector who is licensed and bonded. Also, it’s a good idea to use someone that either your agent or friend/family member has had experience with.

    Mold Inspection
    Mold inspections are not done as regularly as home inspections. But they should be! I always insist that my clients get a mold inspection. Water is a homeowner’s worst enemy and often water damage can go undetected, wreaking havoc behind the scenes. A good mold inspector helps give you a more well-rounded picture of your soon to be new home. And often it can save you from walking into some nightmarish repairs.

    Video Sewer Line Inspection
    If you want to know the condition of your sewer line, you can have a plumber or sewer line specialist come to the property and put a video camera into the sewer line. You will be able to see if there are any blockages in the line or possibly even tree roots that are impeding the sewer line. I usually recommend this to people who are buying older homes with mature trees on the property.

    Roof Inspection
    If you have any questions about the condition of the roof that your home inspector can’t answer or if your home inspector recommends further investigation by a roofer, it’s a good idea to bring someone out who can quote you the cost of a new roof or needed repairs. Often, you can get a roofer to come out for a free estimate.

    Foundation Inspection
    If you are concerned with some visible cracks or the home inspector thinks there could be some foundation issues, it can be a good idea to hire a foundation inspector. I think it’s helpful to find a foundation inspector who’s also a structural engineer.

    Geologic Inspection
    Depending on where this house is located, a geologic inspection is something you may want to consider. If there’s concern with the soil or condition of the land, this can be a worthy investment. Areas like Malibu would be a good place to do a geologic inspection.

    Termite Inspection
    Normally, the seller will pay for a termite inspection. This report will show signs of termite damage, termite infestation, and dry rot. Keep in mind, when a Wood Destroying Pest Addendum is included in a contract, the lender will require that all termite work be done prior to funding the loan. Typically, a seller will agree to pay for these items. It’s just a matter of coordinating the work prior to escrow closing.

    These represent a good number of inspections that you can do as a buyer. Basically, if you have any questions or concerns, you can always bring in an expert for further evaluation. The money you spend on inspections can add up, but it’s a good insurance policy against purchasing a home that will be a money pit of repairs.

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